Young professional looking for opportunity to grow and thrive.

 

postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas
American Violet  (2008)
Brick Lane (2008)
Desert Flower (2009)
Dreams of Life (2011)
Heaven on Earth (2008)
I Will Follow (2011) 
Skin (2008)
The Patience Stone (2013)
Things Never Said (2013)
Yasmin (2004)
Women of Color in Friendship/Family films
Arranged (2007)
Chutney Popcorn (1999)
Eve’s Bayou (1997)
How the Garcia Girls Spent Their Summer (2005)
Radiance (1998)
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
The Sapphires (2011) 
Tortilla Soup (2001)
Waiting to Exhale (1995)
What’s Cooking? (2000)
Women of Color in RomComs
It’s a Wonderful Afterlife(2010)
Miss Dial (2013)
Young Girls of Color
Akeelah and the Bee (2006)
Anita and Me (2002)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)
Life, Above All (2010)
Linda Linda Linda
Rabbit Proof Fence (2002)
Wadjda (2012)
Whale Rider (2002)
Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl (1998)
Yelling to the Sky (2011)
Queer Women of Color
Pariah (2011)
I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Saving Face (2004)
Spider Lilies (2007)
The Journey (2004)
The Peculiar Kind s1 & s2 (web series) 
Yes or No 1 & 2


important

postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas

Women of Color in Friendship/Family films

Women of Color in RomComs

Young Girls of Color

Queer Women of Color

important

(Source: napsnotesandknots)

blackcontemporaryart:

Betye Saar Crossings, 2005Mixed media assemblage on vintage wood object, 26-1/2 x 19-1/8 x 7-1/4, signed and dated, courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY.

blackcontemporaryart:

Betye Saar 
Crossings, 2005
Mixed media assemblage on vintage wood object, 26-1/2 x 19-1/8 x 7-1/4, signed and dated, courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY.

You can never care too much,
you can only choose the wrong things to
hold close.

Rakishi, “things my father wouldn’t say" cir. 1913 (via kvtes)

(Source: 1924.us)

lucyandlouise:

Some facts about Octavia E. Butler

  • Octavia Estelle Butler was born on June 22, 1947 in Pasadena, California.
  • She began writing at an early age despite being dyslexic.
  • She earned her associate’s degree from Pasadena City College in 1968.
  • She later went to study at California State University in L.A.
  • She was a protégé of science fiction writer Harlan Ellison
  • She published her first science fiction book series, Patternmaster, in 1976.
  • She published her breakthrough novel, Kindred, in 1979.
  • In 1987, she published the first book in her Xenogenesis trilogy.
  • She is known for mixing science fiction with different social issues.
  • Her work also features African American spiritualism and black characters. 
  • In the 90s, she published the Parable series.
  • She received the MacArthur “genius” grant from the MacArthur Foundation in 1995, becoming the first science fiction writer to receive the grant.
  • She bought a house for her family and herself with the money.
  • She moved to Seattle, Washington in 1999 in order to work and deal with her writer’s block.
  • Her last novel, Fledgling, was published in 2005.
  • She has also received two Hugo Awards from the World Science Fiction Society and two Nebula Awards from the Science Fiction Writers of America along with MacArthur Foundation grant
  • She died on February 24, 2006 in Seattle at the age of 58.

Sources: nytimes, pinterest

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. 

The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.

In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. 

Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

Kindred- Octavia E. Butler

So I finally finished Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred and I have to say it was a powerful piece because it was able to take me on an emotional roller coaster. It was the first piece of fiction that I have read that really explored the relationship between slave and master on a plantation and the conflicting emotion that goes along with that relationship. I would be bold to say that those who love complex characters, these would be fun to dissect and you should pick up this book. It raised a lot of “What Would You Do” questions in me that sometimes I just could not answer. Overall I loved it, it was a really great read, great for thought and discussion.

God allows us to experience the low points of life in order to teach us lessons that we could learn in no other way.

― C.S. Lewis (via psych-quotes)